4. Discussion

4.1 Analysis of results
The average size of the sodium alginate ball in the 0% solution is 2.8mm, while the one in the 1% solution is 2.4mm. Nothing formed in the 1.5% solution. From the data, this proves that any quantity above 2.4 grams the sodium alginate is less likely to form.

Explain how you analyse your data such that you can make a conclusion.

4.2 Key findings
The sodium citrate does affect the amount of blood coagulation. Based on the data collected, the average size of the sodium alginate ball that formed in the 0% solution is 2.8mm. The average size of the sodium alginate ball that formed in the 1% solution is 2.4mm, which shows that it is smaller and the sodium citrate did affect the size of the sodium alginate ball. There is no average size for the sodium alginate ball that formed in the 1.5% solution because the ball did not form in the solution and burst upon impact.

4.3 Explanation of key findings
Sodium citrate is known for slowing down and/or preventing blood coagulation. With increasing amounts of sodium citrate, it does prove that the amount of coagulation does decrease. The sodium alginate ball that formed in the 0% was firmer jelly, a solid. The sodium alginate ball that formed in the 1% was softer and when we poked it, it burst open and there was still some sodium alginate solution inside it. It was a solid shell. Nothing formed in the 1.5% solution and the sodium alginate solution dissolved in the 1.5% solution.


4.4 Evaluation of Hypothesis
Our hypothesis is that the larger the amount of sodium citrate, the blood clot will form at a slower rate. This is true as supported by evidence from our experiment. Our hypothesis is proven to be true.

4.5 Areas for improvement

In the future, we should try to use real blood to make our results more realistic.

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